Quick Bread – Zucchini Bread

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We had the children’s day celebration at our apartment complex for which they organised a drawing and colouring contest. Sounds good, right? But no. Parents were breathing down the necks of the little ones (read 8 to 10 year olds!) giving them detailed instructions on what they need to draw or the colour they need to use. My daughter made those sad puppy dog eyes making me feel like an ignorant negligent parent in contrast. I have been ranting ever since to all and sundry about how parents need to leave their kids alone to take their own decisions and make their own mistakes so that they can learn their own lessons. Then I found out that the kid whose mom gave the maximum instructions actually won the contest. Now I am in two minds – maybe I should have helped her afterall. She would not have been heartbroken about not winning. But then maybe this will help her deal with life better in the long run. Parenting is tough! Rant complete and I am feeling better already.

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Now on to the dish of the day. I luckily found zucchinis at the local supermarket much to my surprise. I grabbed it and simply had to make a zucchini bread. It turned out fabulous especially with all that cheese in it. Since it is a quick bread, I could eat some before the daughter was back from school and became competition. Yay!

I have begun to replace all purpose flour with wheat flour in most recipes except yeast bread where I think they make a significant difference to the airiness of the bread. In muffins, quick breads, etc. I can manage a reasonable amount of lightness to the dish with whole wheat flour. You could use all purpose flour in this dish just as the original recipe.

Adapted from here

Makes one 7″ loaf

WHAT WE NEED

Zucchini, grated                      3/4 cup

Whole wheat flour                 1 cup

Baking powder                        1 tsp

Baking soda                              1/4 tsp

Salt                                             1/2 tsp

Milk                                            1/2 cup

Apple cider vinegar                1 1/2 tsp

Egg                                              1

Olive Oil                                    1 1/2 tbsp

Cheddar cheese, grated         1/2 cup heaped

Mixed herbs                             2 tsp

WHAT TO DO

  • Preheat the oven to 180C
  • Grease and line a loaf tin with parchment paper
  • Squeeze the grated zucchini gently to release some liquid. I did not do it because I used whole wheat flour which absorbs more water and I did not want the bread to be dry. Squeeze out some liquid (around 2 tsp or so) if you are using all purpose flour.
  • In a bowl, mix the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt together
  • In another bowl, combine the milk and vinegar. Any vinegar will do. I used apple cider vinegar
  • The milk will curdle a bit. Then add the egg and oil and mix well
  • Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix to combine ensuring no dry flour is left
  • Add the zucchini, cheese and mixed herbs and mix lightly
  • Pour the batter into the loaf tin and bake for 1 hour
  • If the toothpick inserted comes clean, the bread is done
  • Cool it for 10-15 minutes in the loaf tin and then unmould it on to the wire rack to cool further
  • Once it is completely cooled, (around an hour) slice and serve
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, Cuisine of the USA.

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Raisin Yeast Water

Once you bake breads with instant / active dry yeast for a reasonable amount of time, it is a natural progression to baking with sourdough. When I read about sourdough, I was fascinated to know that you actually can bake with just flour and water as a starter. I started my usual fanatical search for ​information on sourdough and one thing led to another and I chanced upon baking with yeast water. It absolutely blew me away. I discovered that baking with yeast water is not as popular as baking bread with sourdough or yeast but it is as fascinating and has myriad possibilities as you can imagine.

What is yeast water? Yeast water is water fermented by using fruits / flowers / dry fruits / leaves which can then be used to bake bread. This yeast water lends a fantastic flavour to the bread. It can be used as is i.e. replacing the water quantity in a recipe with yeast water or it can be used along with a sourdough starter. You can make yeast water with a variety of items. Raisins is the easiest since it contains a significant amount of natural sugar. You can also make yeast water with apples, orange, plums, apricot, mint, strawberries, etc.

Strangely there is not enough information online about yeast waters or there is a secret cove that I am yet to discover. Here is whatever I have managed to find out. I will try and keep updating this page with new information based on what I read and also what I observe with my experiments.

I tried to make yeast water with raisins but I was unsuccessful the first time. Next I tried with apples but that was not successful either. Then I tried with raisins again and this time I finally struck gold. I have very few pictures because I took step by step pictures the first couple of time but was disappointed with the results. So I did not click much during this attempt which was finally successful.

HOW TO MAKE YEAST WATER

WHAT YOU NEED

Container

Raisins

Water

Container

  • It can be a plastic or glass jar. Ensure it is transparent so that you can observe the activity within.
  • The size of the jar needs to be such that there are few inches space above the raisins and water for the gas to build up

Raisins

  • The raisins should be preferably organic because other raisins may have sulfur coating which prevents fermentation
  • Ensure organic raisins do not have oil coated on them. That is again detrimental to making yeast water

Water

  • It is ideal to use filtered water
  • Tap water can contain chlorine and will block fermentation and so should not be used
  • To use tap water or chlorinated water, leave it open in a vessel for 24 hours and the chlorine will dissipate and it can be used after that

 

WHAT TO DO

  • There is no specific quantity to make yeast water. It is better to start small. We need the water quantity to be twice that of the raisin quantity. If you are using 1/3 cup of raisins, you will need 2/3 cup of water
  • Choose your container after determining the quantity of raisins and water so that there is some head space in the container for gas build up
  • Wash the container well / sterilize it
  • Place the raisins and water in the container and shut it tightly
  • Set aside for 24 hours
  • After that, shake it 2-3 times everyday and degass it twice a day.
  • Degass means to open the jar for a few seconds and shut it again tightly. Preferably degass at the same time everyday
  • Initially the raisins will be at the bottom of the jar
  • After 3-4 days, all the raisins will rise to the top of the water in the jar and the water will change colour to brown
  • There are three indicators to know that the yeast water is ready – all the raisins have risen to the top of the water, when you shake the jar there is a visible fizz and the strong smell
  • This can take anywhere between 4-6 days depending on the quality of the raisins, water and weather.
  • It can then be used for baking bread
  • It can also be stored in a refrigerator after straining the raisins out for around a month
  • Feed it a spoon of sugar / honey once in 10 days to keep it going
  • While baking, you can also use the raisins in the bread or it can be discarded

Check out a couple of pictures I managed to get of my raisin yeast water

 

I will be posting my bread with yeast water recipe soon. Hope you like it and give it a shot.

Spelt flour & Spinach Loaf

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My original plan for this Mega Marathon was to bake 26 protein rich breads. But I did not find the time to do that and then I modified it to protein rich bakes. Finally I figured I would showcase different vegetarian proteins because quite a few vegetarians I know are tired of the question, ‘What is your protein source?’ But I wanted to have at least one bread in the list. When I saw that spelt flour is protein rich, I knew I had to bake with it.

Remember that Spinach dosa I made last week? I had some of that purée left and needed to use it somewhere before I left for Mumbai. So the idea of a spelt flour bread with spinach was born. I baked it the last day before leaving and so it had to be a quick bread and not my usual yeast bread. 

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Whenever I try a new recipe and make modifications to it, my thought is ‘what is the worst that can happen?’ And then I plod on trying to cook it. This time the results were good but the bread was a little dry. It works great with some butter / cheese. The next time I plan to try it with a 2 tbsp more spinach puree / oil to make it a loaf that can be eaten as is. 

Protein – Spelt flour and spinach

Recipe adapted from here and here

Makes one 7″ loaf

WHAT WE NEED

Spelt flour                    1 1/2 cups

Salt                                1/2 tsp

Baking soda                 1/2 tsp

Honey /maple syrup  1 tbsp

Coconut oil                    5 tsp

Spinach puree            1/2 cup + 1 tbsp

Quick cooking oats      2 tbsp

Sunflower seeds           1 tbsp

WHAT TO DO

  • Preheat the oven to 175C and grease a 7″ loaf tin
  • In a large bowl, combine the flour, baking soda and salt
  • In another bowl, mix the honey, oil and spinach puree
  • Mix the wet ingredients with the dry ingredients to form a dough
  • Shape the dough into a loaf and transfer it to the loaf pan
  • Sprinkle the oats and sunflower seeds on top
  • Bake for 30- 35 minutes till golden brown on top
  • Let it cool for around 20 minutes before cutting it
  • Enjoy with some butter / cheese!

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
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Corn and Tomato Crostini with Cashew Cheese

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Ever since I started baking and reading about baking bread, I have fantasised about baking with bread flour. But t is not available in India and so that idea continued to stay in my fantasies. Though many people say that it doesn’t make much of a difference, I wanted to try it out once. Whenever any friend or relative would travel from the West and ask me what I want, my answer was invariably bread flour and rye flour. The response was mostly eye rolling, sighing and shaking heads in disappointment. Due to many reasons, I couldn’t be successful in this endeavour till one day the husband had to make a 2 day trip to Amsterdam. 

He was not pleased because it took him more time to travel than he would spend there. But I was not going to give up on this chance. I pleaded, coerced and bullied (mostly bullied) him to promise me to get bread flour.  He finally did when he figured he couldn’t get away this time. When he returned I grabbed the suitcase from him and almost tore it open. His exasperation coupled with jet lag was a sight to behold. He also got me some amazing waffle strudel which was one of the most delicious things I tasted. So extra brownie points for that!
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Finally I decided to bake a Boule with it for the Bread Bakers International Breads theme. You have to see the bread flour expanding to fill the bowl. It is so airy and light and has such a beautiful crust and crumb. I am in love and waiting for the husband’s next trip to Europe. Fingers crossed.

So I made some delicious and simple cashew cheese to go along with it. Then I figured I could make a crostini with corn and the cheese and translate that to a protein rich dish. Since I have used bread flour, that is also high in protein which is the icing on the cake. You can try this with any other bread like a baguette or even regular sliced bread. But a homemade bread does give an awesome flavour to it. This is a quick recipe for a breakfast or snack and can be made with whatever veggies no toppings you have on hand. I have used cashew cheese, the recipe for which will be posted next week. But you can use goat cheese or paneer or any other spread like hummus or baba ghanoush. It is all completely left to your imagination.

Protein – Corn and cashew cheese

Makes 6 slices

WHAT WE NEED

Bread slices                       6

Sweet corn, shelled          1/2 cup

Cherry tomatoes                10-12

Cashew cheese                    2-3 tbsp

Mixed herbs                         1 tsp

Fresh coriander                   2-3 stalks

Olive oil

Salt
WHAT TO DO

  • Preheat the oven to 175C
  • Brush the bread slices with olive oil and place them on a greased baking tray
  • Bake for 6-8 minutes. If you want it very crisp, bake for a minute or so longer
  • Cook the corn in a vessel with hot water for 6-8 minutes till it is well done
  • Drain the water from the corn
  • Cut the cherry tomatoes into halves
  • Mix the corn, cherry tomatoes, finely chopped coriander, mixed herbs and salt
  • Take out the bread slices from the oven
  • Spread some cashew cheese on the bread slices
  • Top it with the corn tomato mixture
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Boule for #BreadBakers

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It is after ages that I am participating in a Bread Bakers event again. This time the theme is ‘International Breads’. As bread lovers across the world know that the French are amazing Bakers and France is the home to so many different types of breads. My dish for today is the traditional rustic Boule. According to Wikipedia, “Boule, French for “ball”, is a traditional shape of French bread, resembling a squashed ball. It is a rustic loaf shape that can be made of any type of flour. The name of this bread is the reason a bread baker is referred to as a “boulanger” in French, and a bread bakery a “boulangerie.”

This is my first bread with bread flour. You don’t get bread flour in India and so I never got a chance to try baking with this. Finally, the husband traveled on work to Amsterdam and I convinced him that all I would need is some bread flour. While all purpose flour does make a lovely bread, I found the one with bread flour to be more airy and of better texture. You can try to make this with all purpose flour as well and the results would be quite nice.

Though it is a very simple recipe, it takes a lot of time. You let the dough rest for a total of 16 hours and so that needs a bit of planning. But I found that the flavours develop beautifully and it is totally worth the time. Like it is said, ‘Bread baking takes a lot of time. Thankfully not your time.’

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Makes one loaf

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

Bread flour                   325 gms plus for dusting

Salt                                 8 gms

Instant yeast                3 1/2 gms (1 tsp)

Warm water                 266 gms

 

WHAT TO DO

  • In a large bowl, mix the yeast, salt and bread flour
  • Slowly add the water and bring it all together
  • Mix all the ingredients till the dough becomes a little elastic, about 2-3 minutes
  • Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead for 1-2 minutes
  • Shape it as a ball and place it in a floured bowl
  • Cover it with cling wrap and set it aside for 4 hours at room temperature
  • Punch down the dough and transfer it to a floured surface
  • Shape it into a ball dusting it as required
  • Transfer it to a floured bowl and cover with cling wrap
  • Refrigerate the dough for 12 hours
  • Preheat the oven to 250C
  • Take out the dough and shape it into a ball dusting it as needed
  • Place it on a lightly greased baking tray
  • Slash the dough on top three times or score it with any design of your choice
  • Bake for 25-30 minutes or till golden brown
  • Slice it after it is cooled completely
  • Enjoy with butter and jam or as a crostini!

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Check out other International Breads from the Bread Bakers –

#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. You can see all our of lovely bread by following our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated after each event on the #BreadBakers home page.

We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient. If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com.

BreadBakers

 

Amaranth flour Pizza topped with Broccoli

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We start the second full week of our mega marathon in which we showcase protein rich dishes. Last week, I posted about lentils and beans. This week I will post about protein rich vegetables. The most popular ones are broccoli, peas and asparagus. Though some vegetables are seen to be higher in protein than others, the protein is it much with vegetables. So I have tried to include other protein rich ingredients in these dishes to make them truly protein rich.

In this dish, I have replaced half of the all purpose flour with amaranth flour which is not only protein rich but also gluten free. Since this is my first time baking with amaranth flour, I did not want to risk by replacing the all purpose flour entirely. But with these amazing results, I am confident of baking with 80% amaranth flour next time and the balance with wheat or all purpose flour. If you want a gluten free pizza, you can use this recipe and take 80% of total flour as amaranth and for the balance use tapioca flour. If tapioca flour is not easily available for you, simply buy tapioca pearls (sabudana) and run it through a mixer and pass it through a sieve. Tapioca flour is ready for you.

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For this recipe, I took my usual pizza base recipe and modified it. I was initially skeptical about topping a pizza with broccoli but then I saw many recipes online that steam the broccoli and use white sauce with broccoli rather than the usual red pizza sauce. So I decided to follow suit and even my pizza hating family loved it. Since I wanted to get my daughter to eat it, I made the base thinner and got two medium sized pizzas even after halving the recipe. So set your doubles aside and try this easy and protein rich pizza. I have two recipes for the white sauce which I use for pastas. One is using the traditional method and stirring it in a pan while the other is a microwave quick fix. You can use either recipe to make the white sauce.

Recipe adapted from here

Protein – Broccoli and Amaranth flour

Makes 2  7″ pizzas

WHAT WE NEED

For the base

All purpose flour          1 cup

Amaranth flour             3/4 cup

Instant yeast                   1 1/2 tsp 

Sugar                                1/2 tsp

Warm water                    1/2 cup + 2 tbsp

Salt                                     3/4 tsp

Oil                                       2 tbsp

For the topping & sauce

White sauce                      3/4 cup

Broccoli                              1 cup

Chilly flakes (optional)   

Salt

Mixed herbs (optional)                

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix all the ingredients for the base together till there is no dry flour left 
  • Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface for 5-6 minutes
  • Transfer the dough to a greased bowl 
  • Cover and set it aside till it increases in volume
  • The dough will take around 1 and half hours to expand about 60-70%. Since we have amaranth flour in it, it won’t double easily. But I found this level of expansion satisfactory for making the pizza
  • Steam the broccoli in hot water for 5-6 minutes 
  • Drain the water and mix it with salt and chilly flakes, if using 
  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Divide the dough into 2 or more parts as per your requirement
  • Roll each piece of dough into a circular shape to a thickness of your preference
  • Transfer it to a greased baking tray
  • Spread the white sauce on it leaving an inch at the edges
  • Place the broccoli florets on the sauce and sprinkle some mixed herbs, if using
  • Bake for 18-20 minutes or till the ends start browning
  • Take it out of the oven, divide it into 6 or 8 slices
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. If you are using active dry yeast instead of instant yeast, then you need to mix the yeast, warm water and sugar and set it aside for 5 minutes or till it starts bubbling and turns frothy. Add the oil and salt next and finally the flours and mix well
  2. You can include other vegetables like mushroom and corn along with broccoli 
  3. You can also top it with cheese if you like. I thought this was flavourful as it is and did not need the cheese. If you are topping it with cheese then broil the pizza for a couple of minutes before removing it from the oven for it melt and turn light brown

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon for the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Pita Bread

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This is the second recipe in the Lebanese cuisine theme. It is the classic and most popular dish – the pita. The Pita is a leavened bread made with all purpose flour. It can either be cooked on the stove top or baked in the oven. Having tried both methods, I definitely recommend baking it. The pita puffs up beautifully in the oven and the layers are well formed. It easily gives way to making a pita pocket to put the stuffing in. The pita cooked on the stove top looks well done while the baked one would leave you in doubt as to its doneness. But do not worry, if it puffs up well, it is done well.

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When you make it on a stove top you have to ensure that the skillet is very hot to cook the pita but at the same time not too hot to spoil it. You have to be very careful and vigilant to turn it over at the right time and yet it is not a guarantee that the pita would puff largely instead of small little pockets like a regular roti. But when you bake it, all you need to do is set the temperature and watch while the magic is performed. I also loved the taste of the baked version as against the stovetop version.

You can use the pita with the classic falafel or for a vegetable sandwich. If you have any leftover pitas, simply toast them with butter and garlic and be amazed.

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Recipe from here

Makes 8 pitas

WHAT WE NEED

All purpose flour                       2 1/2 – 3 cups 

Active dry / Instant yeast         2 tsp

Warm water                               1 cup

Salt                                               2 tsp

Olive oil (optional)                    2 tsp
WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the water and yeast in a large bowl and set aside for 2-3 minutes
  • Add 2 1/2 cups of flour, salt and oil to the water and yeast
  • Mix all the ingredients together to form the dough
  • Dust the counter top with some flour and transfer the dough to the counter top
  • Knead the dough well for 7-8 minutes and add some flour if needed to make a smooth and pliable dough
  • Grease the bowl with some olive oil and transfer the dough to it
  • Turn it around in the bowl so that all sides of the dough are well oiled
  • Cover the bowl with a damp kitchen towel or cling wrap and set aside till the dough doubles
  • It can take around 1-2 hours depending on the climate
  • If needed, the dough can be refrigerated at this point and used to make the pita at a later time
  • Once the dough is doubled, divide it into 8 parts and shape each of them into a ball

If cooking on the stovetop

  • Heat the skillet till it is very hot
  • Take each ball of dough and roll it into a 3″ thick circle
  • Transfer the rolled out dough to the skillet and cook for 30 seconds
  • Turn the pita over and cook for a minute or so till the pita puffs up well
  • Take it off the heat 
  • Repeat the same procedure till all 8 pitas are made
  • Enjoy with some falafel and salad!

If baking 

  • Preheat the oven to 230C
  • Roll out each dough ball to a 3″ thick circlular pita
  • Transfer the rolled out dough (as many as can be fitted comfortably) to the baking tray
  • Bake for 3-4 minutes till the pita puffs up
  • Take it out of the oven
  • Repeat the same procedure till all the pitas are baked
  • Enjoy it with some falafel and hummus

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 This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, Lebanese Cuisine’.

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Bobota / Simple Cornbread

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The second dish for the Greek theme is a simple cornbread. While I am not a huge fan of sweet breads, this one has the magic word in it – ‘orange juice’. Anything with orange juice works wonders for me and I immediately picked this dish. It is a quick bread and so the time taken for prep is minimal and the result is a wonderful cornbread with a subtle orange flavour.

The recipe was for a 9″ pie pan but I halved it and I didn’t have a smaller pie pan. So I baked them in mini tart tins which were waiting quite a while to be inaugurated. So I got really cute little cornbreads which were so delectable.

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Makes 7-8 mini cornbreads

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

Cornmeal             1 cup

Baking powder   1/2 tsp heaped

Sugar                     2 tbsp

Orange juice        4 tbsp

Water                    4 tbsp

Olive oil                2 tbsp
WHAT TO DO

  • Preheat the oven to 175C
  • Mix the cornmeal, sugar and baking powder in a bowl
  • Mix the water, orange juice and olive oil in another bowl
  • Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix well to form a batter
  • Pour into the mini tart tins till it is 3/4 full
  • Bake for 30 minutes or till the toothpick inserted comes out clean
  • Cool for 10 minutes
  • Serve warm or at room temperature 
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, Greek dishes.

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Eliopsoma / Olive Breadsticks

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This week’s theme is Greek dishes and I have to make three dishes. But I was so spoilt for choice that picking only three was a tough job. But I couldn’t miss out on the breads and so I picked two breads and a salad for this week. The first is this delicious olive breadstick which is simple to bake and tastes absolutely amazing.

Ideally you would need to twist the dough a little before baking but I missed that because I was in a hurry to go somewhere and so the shapes are not ideal but it doesn’t have much of an impact on the taste or texture of the crumb. So mine tourned out more like a roll and less like breadsticks but all’s well that tastes well. Right?

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Makes 10 bread sticks

Recipe from here

WHAT WE NEED

All purpose flour                       200 gms

Whole wheat flour                       50 gms

Water                                            180 gms

Instant yeast                                     5 gms

Salt                                                      5 gms

Olive oil                                              1 tbsp

Black olives, pitted & chopped   120 gms

Dried thyme                                        1 tsp
WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the flours, yeast and salt in a bowl
  • Add the water and olive oil
  • Knead for 5-7 minutes till it is a wet soft dough
  • Add the olives and thyme and mix well to incorporate them in the dough
  • Place them in a greased bowl till the dough triples in size. It should take around 1- 1 1/2 hours
  • Take out the dough and divide into 10 equal parts
  • Roll each part of the dough and twist to form a stick
  • Place on a greased baking tray, cover and set aside for 30 minutes
  • Preheat the oven at 220C
  • Bake for 15-20 minutes or till the top of the bread stick is nicely brown
  • Cool slightly on a wire rack
  • Serve warm
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, Greek dishes.

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Saffron Buns

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I have to confess. This is part this theme and part a desperate attempt to somehow make it fit into the theme because I couldn’t do it last month as part of the mega marathon. Aren’t they cute? These are Swedish saffron buns and they are so aromatic. As I was telling you yesterday, I have this major fear of forgetting ingredients and letting them go waste. Last year my parents visited Kashmir and my mom went slightly overboard in buying saffron. When I say slightly, I mean ‘I have to gift this to every person of my acquaintance so let me buy the entire supply from the valley’ level overboard. And to her credit she did gift it to almost every person of her acquaintance (you should be friends with my mom, it is so beneficial) but she did prepare for contingencies which left her with quite a few extra cute boxes of saffron. Naturally, I was part inheritor of those boxes and so now I have around 3 boxes of saffron sitting in my fridge and staring at me every time I open it. While I know saffron doesn’t spoil easily, I am still kinda sorta uncomfortable looking at them all the time. So for the past one years, the husband has been wondering as to why all the sweet dishes in the house are orange in colour and I am yet to get through box one. 

Hence you can imagine how insanely happy I was to spot a bread recipe with saffron. I intend making his a weekl dish at home and thankfully the daughter loved it. Yay! And I am sure the husband will like it once he has them. Yes, I had them for lunch, don’t judge me. Anyway this recipe is from Gayathri’s blog and so egg free. Yum is the word.

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Makes 6 pieces

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

Saffron                        a pinch

Hot water                    1 tbsp

All purpose flour       1 1/2 cups

Sugar                            2 tbsp

Instant yeast               1 1/2 tsp

Oil                                  2 tbsp

Curds                             3 tbsp

Milk                                1/4 cup + for wash

Raisins                           12

WHAT TO DO

  • Add the saffron strands to the hot water and set aside
  • Mix the flour, sugar and yeast in a large bowl
  • Add the milk, curds and oil to the bowl
  • Add the saffron water and mix well
  • Knead for 10-12 minutes till you get a soft pliant dough
  • Cover and set aside in a greased bowl till the dough doubles in volume
  • Punch down the dough and divide it into 6 parts
  • Roll each part into a 12″ rope and twist the ends to form the ‘S’ shape
  • Transfer all the 6 portions of the dough to a greased baking tray
  • Keep a raisin at the two ends of the ‘S’ for each portion
  • Set aside for 20-25 minutes
  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Brush the dough with milk just before baking
  • Bake for 20 minutes or till the top is nicely brown
  • Let it cool for 10 minutes
  • Enjoy with some jam or butter or both!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme ‘Picnic Dishes’.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM#76