Peas Paneer Paratha

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Today we celebrated Janmashtami / Lord Krishna’s birthday. I know the rest of the country was done with this last month. But we have our own strange calendar which always schedules Janmashtami when no one else does. When we were kids, my brother and I were told that since God had too many places to visit on a single day, he gave us a after appointment in order to be able to spend more time with us rather than a hurried visit. We felt rather special hearing it. Today I found myself giving a similar explanation to my daughter when she wondered why we chose a different day for the festival. Is this how traditions are started?

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My dish for today is green peas paratha with paneer. My daughter loves paratha of any kind. In other words, if it is round and topped with ghee it can easily be named paratha and she would eat it. So as any mother would, I manage to stuff all kinds of vegetables in the parathas and she gobbles it up. Peas is not one of her favourites. So parathas are the perfect way for her to get all the protein from the peas. As for me, I seem to have a ‘P’ fixation of some sort. I love Peas, Paneer, Paratha, Pizza, Pasta, Panagam, Pongal, etc. Maybe I will eat all salads if they were renamed as Psalads like Psmith. 

This is the first time I measured out ingredients for the paratha to write this post else I always work on estimation. I have not added green chilies to parathas since it is for my 4 year old. But you can add some to the filling to raise the spice quotient.

Protein – Green peas and Paneer (Cottage Cheese)

Makes 6 medium parathas

WHAT WE NEED

For the dough

Whole wheat flour                     400 gms

Oil                                                   2 tsp

Salt

Water


For the filling

Green peas (fresh or frozen)        1/2 cup

Paneer / Cottage cheese                 150 gms

Red chilly powder                           1/4 tsp

Garam masala                                  1/4 tsp

Fresh coriander                                Few sprigs

Salt

Water

Ghee / clarified butter


WHAT TO DO

  • In a large bowl, mix the flour, oil and salt
  • Add water to make a soft dough. Set aside for 20 minutes
  • Heat 2 cups of water in a vessel and add the green peas
  • Cook for 6-8 minutes till it is completely cooked
  • Drain the water and set aside the peas
  • Grate the paneer and transfer it to a bowl
  • Mash the peas nicely and transfer it to the same bowl. If you want you can pulse the peas in a mixer to form a coarse paste
  • Finely chop the fresh coriander and add it along with salt, chilly powder and garam masala to the bowl
  • Mix all the ingredients for the filling together
  • Heat a tava 
  • Divide the dough and the filling into 6 parts each
  • Roll out one portion of the dough with a rolling pin
  • Keep one portion of the filling inside and bring the ends of the rolled out doug together and close it
  • Roll it out again carefully to ensure that the dough does not tear and filling does not come out
  • Transfer it to the tava and cook on one side
  • After a minute, turn it over and let it cook on the other side 
  • Once both sides are cooked, take it off the tava and brush it with some ghee
  • Repeat the same process with the rest of the dough and filling
  • Serve warm with curds or pickle
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

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Mushroom Egg Rice

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My second recipe with vegetable sources of protein is this simple mushroom and egg rice. Mushroom is one of the veggies to be high on protein. But like I mentioned yesterday, most of my recipes for this week has an additional protein source to truly qualify as a ‘protein rich’ dish.

This dish is one of my go-to mixed rice variations. Usually I toss in whatever vegetables I have on hand and name the dish later. I usually make it when I have just shopped for the week’s vegetables and so I would be able to spare a little of everything or the day before vegetable shopping when I have bits and pieces of everything. The mushroom and egg can be replaced with any vegetable of your choice. Carrots, peas, corn, mint, baby corn are all good options.

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Protein – Mushroom and Egg

Serves 2-3

WHAT WE NEED

Basmati Rice                               1 cup

Button mushrooms                   150 gms

Eggs                                              3

Oil                                                 2-3 tsp

Cloves                                           3

Cinnamon                                   1″

Cardamom                                  3

Star anise                                    1

Garlic cloves                               3

Red chilly powder                     1/2 tsp

Garam masala                            1 tsp

Salt

Water

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Wash and soak the basmati rice in water for half hour
  • Drain and cook it in a pan with 4 cups of water
  • Once the rice has been cooked, drain the water and pass the rice through running water to stop cooking. Set it aside
  • Chop the mushrooms and set aside
  • In a pan, heat the oil
  • Add cloves, cinnamon, cardamom and star anise
  • After a minute, finely chop and add the garlic cloves
  • Once the garlic starts turning brown, add the red chilly powder and chopped mushrooms
  • Cover and cook for 3-4 minutes on low
  • Beat the eggs in a bowl and pour it in the pan
  • After a minute, stir the eggs to scramble it and let it cook for 2-3 minutes
  • Ensure any water from the mushroom has been fully absorbed before adding the rice
  • Add the rice, garam masala and salt and mix well
  • Cover and cook for 2-3 minutes
  • Enjoy with raita or chips of your choice!

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Rajma Masala

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When I made the list of dishes, I did not realize that most of the recipes with lentils and beans are a traditional and classic dish from different cuisines. Today I am posting about the ubiquitous Rajma Masala. I have hardly made this dish because the husband hates rajma. For someone who eats most Indian dishes, his hatred for rajma is absolutely perplexing to me. But the only way I have managed to get him to eat this bean is by making a ‘sundal’ with it and adding coconut (lots of coconut).

During our Blogging Marathon meet earlier this year, Preeti of Simply Tadka generously fed us all some amazing rajma masala immediately on our arrival at the airport. I, for one, was blown over by the amazing amalgamation of flavours with the rajma and the dish lingered in my memory long after. Then one day, just like that, I started craving for some rajma magic just like my typical bread and cheese cravings. I simply had to make and devour it at the earliest. 

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So I ran down to the shop in our apartment complex which is a magical world in itself. You can find almost anything you need there. I have never seen it shut despite going there at all odd hours (because cravings!).  The bonus is that the shop owner is from Kerala and so he gets the most amazing banana chips ever. As soon as the chips arrive you can see people grabbing a packet lest the stock runs out. And it does run out pretty fast. The first time I had those chips I knew 2 things – one, those are the fresh-est, tastiest banana chips ever, and two, I am never going to successfully lose weight. 

Anyway, back to our dish of the day –

Protein – Rajma / Kidney beans

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

Rajma / Kidney beans                                  1 cup

Onion, large                                                   1

Tomatoes, medium                                       3

Garlic cloves                                                   4

Ginger                                                              1″

Green chillies                                                  2

Coriander powder                                         1 tsp

Red chilly powder                                         1/2 tsp

Turmeric powder                                          1/4 tsp

Asofoetida                                                       a pinch

Garam masala                                                1/2 tsp

Cumin seeds                                                    1/2 tsp

Kasuri methi                                                    1 tsp

Oil                                                                      3 tbsp

Milk                                                                   3 tbsp

Water

Salt
WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the rajma overnight or for 8 hours
  • Drain the water and add 4 cups of water to the rajma
  • Pressure cook for 4 whistles and set aside for 15 minutes till the entire pressure from the cooker is released
  • Check if the rajma is fully cooked by pressing a bean between your fingers. If it cannot be mashed then cook for another 10 minutes
  • Heat oil in a pan and add cumin seeds
  • Finely chop the onions and add to the pan
  • Let it cook till the onions start browning
  • Grind the ginger, garlic and green chillies to a paste
  • Add the paste to the pan, mix and cook for a minute
  • Chop the tomatoes and add them to the pan
  • Salute for 2-3 minutes till the tomatoes become soft
  • Add the spice powders – turmeric, red chilly, coriander, garam masala and asofoetida
  • Mix well and cook till the oil starts leaving the sides of the pan
  • Drain the water from the rajma and set it aside
  • Add the rajma to the pan and mix well
  • Add 1 1/2 cups of water that was used to cook the rajma 
  • Add salt and simmer without a lid for 10-12 minutes
  • We need the gravy to thicken slightly and not be watery
  • Mash a few rajma beans to thicken the gravy
  • Add kasuri methi and milk
  • Mix well and simmer for 2 minutes
  • Serve with roti or rice
  • Enjoy!

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 This is my post for the Mega Marathon under ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Dal Khichdi

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Today’s recipe is another classic dish. Dal Khichdi has as many recipes as there are people eating it and I thought I should put my version on paper (or screen) and send it into the world to jostle for space among the other simple and complex khichdi recipes. This is the version that the family has finally accepted after my innumerable attempts to get them to have a veggie filled version.

My usual khichdi theme is tossing in bits and pieces of all available vegetables, finely chopped and adding as much rice and lentils as I can find around. But the husband and daughter have never relished it (I loved it) and would constantly complain about having to eat it and expected me to feel obliged for it. Ha! Me cooking and me also obliged? Not happening.

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During one of our trips to the restaurant, Rajdhani I caught my husband relishing the khichdi there and was obviously infuriated. He, to be fair, said he loved the dish without the veggies in it and promised to eat it if I could recreate the same taste. So this is my attempt at recreating the khichdi of Rajdhani. Though it is not a hundred percent similar, it is so aromatic and flavorful. More importantly the husband and daughter relish it. Mission Impossible is possible, after all.

Protein – Split skinless green gram / yellow mung / paitham parupu

Serves 3-4 people

WHAT WE NEED

Raw rice                                        3/4 cup

Split skinless green gram          1/2 cup

Ghee / clarified butter                2-3 tbsp

Roasted cumin powder              2-3 tsp

Turmeric powder                        1/4 tsp

Asofoetida                                     1-2 tsp

Salt

Water

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Wash the rice and lentils 2-3 times and set aside
  • The khichdi can either be made in the pressure cooker or in a pan. Pressure cooker is easier since it needs minimal involvement from you.
  • If you are using the pressure cooker, add the rice, lentils, salt and 4 1/4 cups of water and cook for 3-4 whistles. Open after the pressure has completely left, around 15 minutes.
  • If you are like me and like to have more control on the dish, then use a pan
  • Take a large pan and put it on the gas
  • Add the rice, lentils and 3 cups of water
  • Cover and cook on high for 5-7 minutes. Check every 3 minutes or so to see how the cooking is coming along
  • Add salt, turmeric powder and 1 tsp of roasted cumin powder and 1 cup water and mix well
  • Continue cooking till the rice and lentils form a mushy mixture and have absorbed nearly the entire water
  • If you like a runny khichdi, then add additional water as per your need and cook for 2-3 minutes
  • If you don’t want it runny, then open and cook on simmer till the khichdi gets a little thick
  • Always turn off the gas when the khichdi is little more runny than you want because it will continue to cook for some time in the residual heat after turning off the gas
  • Heat 2 tbsp ghee in a small pan and add the balance roasted cumin powder and asofoetida and let it sizzle for a few seconds
  • Pour the ghee with the flavours into the khichdi and mix well
  • Check and adjust for taste . Add some more cumin powder or asofoetida, if you like
  • Serve warm with raita or chips and a dollop of ghee for best results
  • Enjoy especially on a rainy afternoon or chilly evening

 

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Beans Parupu Usili

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Today I have a recipe with the most used lentil at home, the split pigeon peas / ṭoor dal. As a Tamilian, we use this in many dishes including rasam and sambhar, without which it is tough for us to survive. Parupu usili ( lentil scrambled) is always a part of any celebration menu, be it a wedding or new year. 

The key consideration for this dish, according to me, is the balance between the vegetable and the lentil. In weddings, the lentil is almost double the quantity of the vegetable, probably to save costs and adjust for large number of people. That is something I do to manage unexpected guests. But an ideal combination for me is the lentil is little less than 1/2 of the vegetable by weight. It ensures that the flavours of both mingle well and neither dominates the other.

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Another consideration is the oil required for cooking the lentils. I agree it is on the higher side but that compensates by being absolutely delicious. I have tried steaming the lentils instead of frying and it does turn out ok. It uses lesser oil and needs almost zero involvement from you. But once you are used to the frying, it is hard to settle for the steamed version. 

This was one of the first dishes my mother-in-law taught me and also one of the first I perfected earning her admiration. 

Protein – Toor dal / split pigeon peas

Recipe from my mother-in-law with some modifications by me

Serves 4

WHAT WE NEED

French beans                          250 gms

Ṭoor dal / split pigeon peas  1/2 cup heaped / 120 gms

Dried red chillies                    2-3

Oil                                              3-5 tbsp

Mustard seeds                         1/2 tsp

Curry leaves                             1 sprig

Water

Salt

WHAT TO DO     

  • Soak the ṭoor dal and dried red chillies in 2 cups of water for 3 hours. If you are in a hurry, soak them in boiling hot water for 20 minutes
  • Cut the beans into 1/2 inch long pieces
  • Heat 1 tsp oil in a pan and add mustard seeds
  • Once the seeds splutter, tear and add the curry leaves
  • Then add the beans, salt (required for the beans) and 1/2 cup water 
  • Cover and cook till it is done. Add additional water if needed 
  • Ensure that the entire water is used up in cooking the beans and no part of it is left with the beans. If so, then the end result will be soggy and blob like with the lentils. If the water added to the beans is in excess, then drain it out and cook. Set aside
  • Drain the water from the ṭoor dal and chillies add them to a blender. If you have soaked it ib hot water you need to wait for 10 minutes for the dal to slightly cool down
  • Add salt and grind to a coarse paste. You may probably only need to pulse it a few times else it becomes a very smooth paste and that is not what we want
  • Heat 2 tbsp oil in a pan and add the ground lentil paste. You can use the same pan which cooked the beans but I usually wipe it down with a tissue / cloth before cooking the lentils. If it is your first time, a non stick pan is recommended since it would be easier to work with
  • With a steel / wooden spatula, break up the paste across the pan and let it cook in the oil
  • Break it up frequently and stir to cook.
  • If you see it getting dry but yet uncooked, add another tbsp of oil and continue to break up the paste and stir
  • The final result, after around 10-12 minutes, should be near sand like texture, well cooked, dry but not too dry and not very oily
  • Mix the lentils with the beans and simmer for 2-3 minutes for the beans to slightly warm up
  • Serve with rasam and rice
  • Enjoy!

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 This is my post for Day 3 of the mega marathon for the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Pita Bread

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This is the second recipe in the Lebanese cuisine theme. It is the classic and most popular dish – the pita. The Pita is a leavened bread made with all purpose flour. It can either be cooked on the stove top or baked in the oven. Having tried both methods, I definitely recommend baking it. The pita puffs up beautifully in the oven and the layers are well formed. It easily gives way to making a pita pocket to put the stuffing in. The pita cooked on the stove top looks well done while the baked one would leave you in doubt as to its doneness. But do not worry, if it puffs up well, it is done well.

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When you make it on a stove top you have to ensure that the skillet is very hot to cook the pita but at the same time not too hot to spoil it. You have to be very careful and vigilant to turn it over at the right time and yet it is not a guarantee that the pita would puff largely instead of small little pockets like a regular roti. But when you bake it, all you need to do is set the temperature and watch while the magic is performed. I also loved the taste of the baked version as against the stovetop version.

You can use the pita with the classic falafel or for a vegetable sandwich. If you have any leftover pitas, simply toast them with butter and garlic and be amazed.

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Recipe from here

Makes 8 pitas

WHAT WE NEED

All purpose flour                       2 1/2 – 3 cups 

Active dry / Instant yeast         2 tsp

Warm water                               1 cup

Salt                                               2 tsp

Olive oil (optional)                    2 tsp
WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the water and yeast in a large bowl and set aside for 2-3 minutes
  • Add 2 1/2 cups of flour, salt and oil to the water and yeast
  • Mix all the ingredients together to form the dough
  • Dust the counter top with some flour and transfer the dough to the counter top
  • Knead the dough well for 7-8 minutes and add some flour if needed to make a smooth and pliable dough
  • Grease the bowl with some olive oil and transfer the dough to it
  • Turn it around in the bowl so that all sides of the dough are well oiled
  • Cover the bowl with a damp kitchen towel or cling wrap and set aside till the dough doubles
  • It can take around 1-2 hours depending on the climate
  • If needed, the dough can be refrigerated at this point and used to make the pita at a later time
  • Once the dough is doubled, divide it into 8 parts and shape each of them into a ball

If cooking on the stovetop

  • Heat the skillet till it is very hot
  • Take each ball of dough and roll it into a 3″ thick circle
  • Transfer the rolled out dough to the skillet and cook for 30 seconds
  • Turn the pita over and cook for a minute or so till the pita puffs up well
  • Take it off the heat 
  • Repeat the same procedure till all 8 pitas are made
  • Enjoy with some falafel and salad!

If baking 

  • Preheat the oven to 230C
  • Roll out each dough ball to a 3″ thick circlular pita
  • Transfer the rolled out dough (as many as can be fitted comfortably) to the baking tray
  • Bake for 3-4 minutes till the pita puffs up
  • Take it out of the oven
  • Repeat the same procedure till all the pitas are baked
  • Enjoy it with some falafel and hummus

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 This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, Lebanese Cuisine’.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Falafel

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My theme for this week is Lebanese cuisine. Of course, the first few dishes that come to mind are pita bread, hummus and falafel. I was wondering if it would be too cliche to make these dishes for this theme but then I figured it is unbelievable that I still don’t have these classic recipes on my blog. So I am posting recipes for three ingredients in a pita sandwich – falafel, pita bread and labneh. Get them together and it will be pure bliss. Even the husband, who does not experiment much with food, loved this. So you surely don’t need a bigger proof of the deliciousness of this awesome meal.

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Falafel is a nice balance between guilt and pleasure. It is a chickpea based dish and so good on the protein front but at the same time, it is deep fried and makes you a little guilty if you are trying to eat healthy / lose weight. You can bake them too but this is the first time I am making these and so I did not want to risk that with the family. I am researching on getting an equally delicious baked version and will update this post soon in that regard. My recipe, as usual, is more spicy and has curry powder instead of paprika and cayenne to make it more favorable to the husband and daughter. Now, on to the recipe –

Makes 20-25 falafels

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

Chickpeas                 1/2 cup

Onion, small            1

Garlic cloves            2

Coriander leaves    2-3 sprigs

Green chilly             1

Curry powder          1 tsp

Red chilly powder   1/2 tsp

Sesame seeds           2 tsp

Cumin seeds             1 tsp

Salt

Oil for deep frying

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the chickpeas in a large bowl of water and set it aside for around 6 hours or overnight
  • Drain the water from the chickpeas
  • Take all the ingredients, except oil, in a food processor or blender and blend it to a thick paste
  • If you find it tough to blend then add few teaspoons of water but ensure that the thick paste is formed after blending
  • Heat the oil for deep frying
  • Transfer the paste to a bowl and pinch out some dough the size of a small lemon
  • Roll the piece of dough into a small ball and set it aside
  • Continue to form small balls with the rest of the dough
  • Once the oil is sufficiently heated, drop few balls of dough into it and reduce the flame to low
  • Fry till they turn golden brown
  • Repeat the same procedure to fry all the dough balls
  • Enjoy it with pita and hummus / labneh!

For a pita sandwich, divide a pita bread into two and open each half into a pocket. Apply some labneh or hummus inside the pita and fill it with falafel, tomato and cucumber slices.

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, Lebanese Cuisine.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Taftan

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When i first made my list of breads for this mega marathon, I took great pains to avoid flatbreads because, in my head, I always liken bread to the rise in the oven mostly overwhelming the loaf pan. But this recipe looked delicious and also, I did not have too many options from T. So I decided to go ahead with it. It was one of the first breads I made for this marathon and it paired beautifully with the dal makhni.

Taftan, taftoon or taftun is a leavened flour bread from Persian, Pakistani and Uttar Pradesh cuisines, baked in a clay oven. This bread is made with milk, yoghurt, and eggs. It is often flavoured with saffron and a small amount of cardamom powder, and may be decorated with seeds such as poppy seeds.

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Country – Iran

Makes 8-9 taftans

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

All purpose flour           1 3/4 cups

Sugar                                1 tbsp

Instant yeast                   1 tbsp

Milk                                  1 cup

Curd / Yogurt                   2 tbsp

Ghee                                  3 tbsp

Oil                                      1 tbsp

Caraway / carom seeds    To sprinkle

WHAT TO DO

  • Sift the flour, add salt, sugar, yeast and yogurt and mix well
  • Add 2 tbsp of ghee and knead into a dough by slowly adding milk. You may not need the entire milk. Add 3/4 cup first and then add 1 tbsp at a time to get a soft elastic dough 
  • Cover and set aside the dough in a greased bowl till doubles in volume, about an hour
  • Preheat the oven at 200C
  • Brush the oil over the dough and divide it into 8-9 pieces 
  • Roll out each dough piece into a circle which is thicker at the edges
  • Make indents / grooves on the dough with your fingertips
  • Grease a baking tray and place 1-2 rolled out dough on the baking tray 
  • Sprinkle the top with caraway seeds / carom seeds 
  • Bake for 7-8 minutes and spread some ghee on the taftan and bake again for another 7-8 minutes or till it starts turning golden brown
  • Repeat the same procedure till all the taftans are baked
  • Enjoy with dal or curry of your choice!

NOTES

  1. These taftans can also be cooked on the tava like a regular roti but it takes 6-8 minutes per taftan. 

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 This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the letter ‘T’.

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 75

Bhindi Masala

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I made Bhindi Masala as part of my North Indian Thali theme for this month’s Blogigng Marathon. Mixed with onion, tomatoes and spices, it is a simple and tasty way to have lady’s fingers.

Serves 3-4

Recipe adapted from here.

Lady’s fingers / Okra          250gms

Cumin seeds                           1/2 tsp

Onion, large                            1

Ginger                                       1″

Garlic cloves                            2

Coriander powder                  1 tsp

Red chilly powder                   1/2 tsp

Turmeric powder                     1/2 tsp

Garam masala                           1/2 tsp

Amchur powder                        1/2 tsp

Oil                                                   3 tbsp

Salt
WHAT TO DO

  • Wash and pat dry the lady’s fingers
  • Cut them to 1″ pieces and set aside
  • Heat 2 tbsp oil and add the lady’s fingers to it
  • Add amchur powder and salt and mix well.
  •  Cook covered tossing it at regular intervals
  • Set aside the lady’s fingers and heat 1 tbsp oil in the same pan
  • Add the cumin seeds
  • Once the cumin seeds are roasted, finely chop and add the onion
  • Once the onion is translucent, add coriander powder, turmeric powder, red chilly powder, garam masala, salt and cook for a minute
  • Add the lady’s finger and mix well
  • Cook covered on simmer for 5-6 minutes
  • Serve warm with rotis
  • Enjoy!

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North Indian Thali

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As a South Indian who lived in Mumbai most of my life, I have been frequently irritated when people assumed that all South Indians were ‘Madrasis’ without understanding the significant cultural and linguistic differences between the four southern states. Later, when I moved to Chennai and then to Bangalore I realized that the reverse was also true. The average citizen in the south is also is not aware about the differences between Punjabi and Rajasthani and Bihari culture or cuisine. Everything was bracketed under ‘North Indian’ and the revenge complete 😉

So my Thali for today is an assimilation of different North Indian states and what is generally called the ‘North Indian Thali’. This Thali usually has –

  • an option of chapati or poori 
  • One dal, almost always the yellow dal made with toor dal
  • One dry vegetable usually a toss between potatoes or lady’s fingers
  • One gravy vegetable, almost always a paneer dish
  • A raita. 
  • One sweet, popular choice is the Gulab Jamun
  • Rice – plain or jeera rice
  • Buttermilk – with the addition of roasted cumin powder, asafoetida and salt

The other items – Aam pana which is a raw mango coolant and kachoris, a spicy, fried snack and the sprouted green gram salad are my additions and are not usually found in this thali. 

I have the recipe for the Bhindi Masala here. Try it and enjoy!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme – Thalis.

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