Dryfruit Milk / Masala Doodh

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It is that time of the year again when I need to bake a cake – the husband’s birthday. I just realised that he is travelling every other year on his birthday and so this is only the third cake I am baking. The first few years were easy. We stayed with my in-laws and didn’t have an oven. Then we moved to Bangalore and I bought an oven and started this blog. The husband then started his dialogue – ‘You have an oven and a blog yet you don’t bake a cake for my birthday.’ How to explain to him that I bought the oven to bake bread not cake. So this has kind of become an annual ritual except for when he travels.

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Now baking cake and baking bread are two completely different things. But few people get that. Whenever I meet someone new and mention my baking and blog, the first thing they ask me is if I can bake a cake for them / someone they know. This is very similar to people asking me to file their tax returns when they hear I am a Chartered Accountant. It is very hard in both cases to explain that while it might seem similar, the stuff I do is very different from what they think I do. So I end up not mentioning either my profession or passion and now people think I am good for nothing. Life is tough!

I know that there is no connection between this and the dish for today. But one of the reasons I started the blog is to be able to rant about stuff. So there. Today’s dish is a simple and satisfying masala doodh. My default method was to warm the milk and mix the ground dry fruits to it and wonder why it does not taste similar to what I get in restaurants. When I had to pick a protein rich dish for this marathon, I figured it was time to explore the mystery of the masala milk and discover the secret behind the difference. Well, the secret, just like for most things, is simply more time and patience. And more sugar, but we shall ignore that.

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Protein – Pistachios and Almonds

Serves 2

Recipe from here

WHAT WE NEED

Milk                                     3 cups

Saffron                                a generous pinch

Cardamom powder          1/4 tsp

Nutmeg powder                a pinch

Almonds                             8

Pistachios                           8

Sugar                                   2-3 tbsp

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Boil the milk in a deep pan / vessel
  • Once it comes to a boil, simmer it for 12-15 minutes and stir frequently till the milk reduces in quantity and becomes slightly thick
  • While the milk is simmering, blanch the almonds and pistachios and peel the skin
  • Grind the two nuts to a coarse powder
  • Add the saffron, cardamom powder, nutmeg powder and sugar to the milk and mix well
  • Simmer for 2-3 minutes
  • Add the almonds and pistachios and mix well
  • Serve warm or cold
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the mega marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

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Honey Roasted Almonds 

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Today, we have a quick almond snack. This is the second day of the week in which I will be posting recipes of protein rich nuts and seeds. The daughter loves almonds and this made her eat them all the more. What more to ask for!

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Protein – Almonds

Recipe from here

WHAT WE NEED

Honey                             2 tbsp

Cinnamon powder       1/4 tsp

Almonds                         1  cup

Salt                                   1/4 tsp heaped
WHAT TO DO

  • Preheat the oven at 175C
  • Heat the honey in a microwave safe bowl for 1 minute on low power
  • Add the cinnamon and almonds to the honey and mix well
  • Line a baking tray with parchement paper
  • Spread the almonds on parchment paper
  • Bake for 10-12 minutes
  • Take the tray out once after 6 minutes and give it a shake
  • Let it cool completely
  • Transfer it to a bowl and mix with salt
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. Let the almonds cool completely before transferring to the bowl. I did not wait long enough and the skin on the almonds came off. While it did not make an impact on the taste, it did not look very pretty.

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Spinach Dosa

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This is the last day of the week and my final vegetable based protein dish. Spinach is the vegetable of choice. As a kid, I was anemic for sometime which my mother took as a personal affront. So she fed me a bunch of spinach each day pureed. She refused to stop even after my hemoglobin levels were over the threshold so much so that I was convinced that my vein, if cut, would bleed green instead of red.

I read somewhere recently that if two people in a house agree on the fan speed then they are definitely not married. I think that should be extended to dosas as well. The husband and I have completely different views on what a perfect dosa should be like. He thinks dosa should be thick and small while I think any dosa thicker than a banned plastic bag should be termed an uthapam.   

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I make spinach dosas mostly when the batter is insufficient for the number of dosas needed. I add some spinach purée which increases the volume of the batter and also gives it a nice flavour. I paired this with some lentil and coconut chutney which I came up with when I discovered that I didn’t have any fried gram to make the regular coconut chutney. I had some mixed lentil powder we use to mix with rice. So I blended it together with some coconut, ginger and green chillies. It tasted very nice with the dosa and we had a lovely weekend breakfast.

Protein – Spinach, Skinless black gram / Urad dal

Makes 15 dosas

WHAT WE NEED

Dosa batter                            4 cups

Spinach                                   1 small bunch

Green chillies                        1-2

Salt
WHAT TO DO

  • Wash and chop the spinach
  • Blend it along with the green chillies, salt and little water to a fine purée
  • Mix around 1/3 cup of purée with the batter 
  • The consistency of the batter should be slightly less than regular dosa batter but not as watery as a rava dosa batter
  • Heat a tava and pour a ladle full of batter on it
  • Spread the batter in a circular motion and pour few drops of oil around the edges of the dosa
  • Once it starts browning at the edges, use a steel spatula and turn it over
  • Let it cook for a minute and then take it off the tava
  • Repeat the process with the rest of the batter till you have as many dosas as you need
  • Serve warm with chutney or molaga podi
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Thai scented Asparagus Soup

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The protein for today is Asparagus. It is one of the vegetables high in protein. Most of my experience with asparagus is what I have watched on Masterchef Australia. It is one of the vegetables I used to drool over and wonder how it would taste. Asparagus is not very easily available in India. But when I saw that it was rich in proteins I wanted to make at least one dish using asparagus. Luckily, I found a small bunch which did not leave me with too many options for dishes. But I figured a soup always works, especially for me. Then I found this absolutely delightful soup with asparagus and coconut milk and I knew I had to make it. 

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I added some spring onions in addition to onions and 

Protein – Asparagus

Recipe adapted from here

Serves 2

WHAT WE NEED

Asparagus                              100 gms

Onion, large                           1

Spring onion green               1/2 cup

Oil / unsalted butter              1 tbsp

Pepper, ground                      1/2 tsp

Coconut milk                           3/4 cup

Vegetable stock                        2 – 3 cups 

Lemongrass, dried                  3 small stalks

Ginger, grated                          1 tbsp

Lemon juice                             1/4 tsp

Salt

WHAT TO DO

  • Cut asparagus into 1″ small pieces
  • In a pan, heat the oil / butter 
  • Chop the onions and add it to the pan
  • Once it turns translucent add spring onions, lemongrass and ginger
  • Cook for 4-5 minutes
  • Add asparagus, salt and pepper and cook for 5 minutes over medium heat stirring frequently
  • Add coconut milk and 2 cups of vegetable stock and cook till the asparagus is tender, about 10 minutes
  • Turn off the gas and let it cool for some time
  • Transfer the contents of the pan to a blender and blend until smooth
  • If the soup is too thick, add 1/2 cup of vegetable stock and cook in the pan for 5 minutes on medium. Else warm the soup for 5 mins in the pan
  • Turn off the gas and add lemon juice and garnish with fresh coriander
  • Enjoy with some bread

NOTES

  1. You can either use fresh or dried lemongrass. If you use dried lemongrass, remove it from the soup before blending it. If using fresh lemongrass, finely chop and add it along with ginger.

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Peas Paneer Paratha

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Today we celebrated Janmashtami / Lord Krishna’s birthday. I know the rest of the country was done with this last month. But we have our own strange calendar which always schedules Janmashtami when no one else does. When we were kids, my brother and I were told that since God had too many places to visit on a single day, he gave us a after appointment in order to be able to spend more time with us rather than a hurried visit. We felt rather special hearing it. Today I found myself giving a similar explanation to my daughter when she wondered why we chose a different day for the festival. Is this how traditions are started?

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My dish for today is green peas paratha with paneer. My daughter loves paratha of any kind. In other words, if it is round and topped with ghee it can easily be named paratha and she would eat it. So as any mother would, I manage to stuff all kinds of vegetables in the parathas and she gobbles it up. Peas is not one of her favourites. So parathas are the perfect way for her to get all the protein from the peas. As for me, I seem to have a ‘P’ fixation of some sort. I love Peas, Paneer, Paratha, Pizza, Pasta, Panagam, Pongal, etc. Maybe I will eat all salads if they were renamed as Psalads like Psmith. 

This is the first time I measured out ingredients for the paratha to write this post else I always work on estimation. I have not added green chilies to parathas since it is for my 4 year old. But you can add some to the filling to raise the spice quotient.

Protein – Green peas and Paneer (Cottage Cheese)

Makes 6 medium parathas

WHAT WE NEED

For the dough

Whole wheat flour                     400 gms

Oil                                                   2 tsp

Salt

Water


For the filling

Green peas (fresh or frozen)        1/2 cup

Paneer / Cottage cheese                 150 gms

Red chilly powder                           1/4 tsp

Garam masala                                  1/4 tsp

Fresh coriander                                Few sprigs

Salt

Water

Ghee / clarified butter


WHAT TO DO

  • In a large bowl, mix the flour, oil and salt
  • Add water to make a soft dough. Set aside for 20 minutes
  • Heat 2 cups of water in a vessel and add the green peas
  • Cook for 6-8 minutes till it is completely cooked
  • Drain the water and set aside the peas
  • Grate the paneer and transfer it to a bowl
  • Mash the peas nicely and transfer it to the same bowl. If you want you can pulse the peas in a mixer to form a coarse paste
  • Finely chop the fresh coriander and add it along with salt, chilly powder and garam masala to the bowl
  • Mix all the ingredients for the filling together
  • Heat a tava 
  • Divide the dough and the filling into 6 parts each
  • Roll out one portion of the dough with a rolling pin
  • Keep one portion of the filling inside and bring the ends of the rolled out doug together and close it
  • Roll it out again carefully to ensure that the dough does not tear and filling does not come out
  • Transfer it to the tava and cook on one side
  • After a minute, turn it over and let it cook on the other side 
  • Once both sides are cooked, take it off the tava and brush it with some ghee
  • Repeat the same process with the rest of the dough and filling
  • Serve warm with curds or pickle
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.
BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Mushroom Egg Rice

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My second recipe with vegetable sources of protein is this simple mushroom and egg rice. Mushroom is one of the veggies to be high on protein. But like I mentioned yesterday, most of my recipes for this week has an additional protein source to truly qualify as a ‘protein rich’ dish.

This dish is one of my go-to mixed rice variations. Usually I toss in whatever vegetables I have on hand and name the dish later. I usually make it when I have just shopped for the week’s vegetables and so I would be able to spare a little of everything or the day before vegetable shopping when I have bits and pieces of everything. The mushroom and egg can be replaced with any vegetable of your choice. Carrots, peas, corn, mint, baby corn are all good options.

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Protein – Mushroom and Egg

Serves 2-3

WHAT WE NEED

Basmati Rice                               1 cup

Button mushrooms                   150 gms

Eggs                                              3

Oil                                                 2-3 tsp

Cloves                                           3

Cinnamon                                   1″

Cardamom                                  3

Star anise                                    1

Garlic cloves                               3

Red chilly powder                     1/2 tsp

Garam masala                            1 tsp

Salt

Water

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Wash and soak the basmati rice in water for half hour
  • Drain and cook it in a pan with 4 cups of water
  • Once the rice has been cooked, drain the water and pass the rice through running water to stop cooking. Set it aside
  • Chop the mushrooms and set aside
  • In a pan, heat the oil
  • Add cloves, cinnamon, cardamom and star anise
  • After a minute, finely chop and add the garlic cloves
  • Once the garlic starts turning brown, add the red chilly powder and chopped mushrooms
  • Cover and cook for 3-4 minutes on low
  • Beat the eggs in a bowl and pour it in the pan
  • After a minute, stir the eggs to scramble it and let it cook for 2-3 minutes
  • Ensure any water from the mushroom has been fully absorbed before adding the rice
  • Add the rice, garam masala and salt and mix well
  • Cover and cook for 2-3 minutes
  • Enjoy with raita or chips of your choice!

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Amaranth flour Pizza topped with Broccoli

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We start the second full week of our mega marathon in which we showcase protein rich dishes. Last week, I posted about lentils and beans. This week I will post about protein rich vegetables. The most popular ones are broccoli, peas and asparagus. Though some vegetables are seen to be higher in protein than others, the protein is it much with vegetables. So I have tried to include other protein rich ingredients in these dishes to make them truly protein rich.

In this dish, I have replaced half of the all purpose flour with amaranth flour which is not only protein rich but also gluten free. Since this is my first time baking with amaranth flour, I did not want to risk by replacing the all purpose flour entirely. But with these amazing results, I am confident of baking with 80% amaranth flour next time and the balance with wheat or all purpose flour. If you want a gluten free pizza, you can use this recipe and take 80% of total flour as amaranth and for the balance use tapioca flour. If tapioca flour is not easily available for you, simply buy tapioca pearls (sabudana) and run it through a mixer and pass it through a sieve. Tapioca flour is ready for you.

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For this recipe, I took my usual pizza base recipe and modified it. I was initially skeptical about topping a pizza with broccoli but then I saw many recipes online that steam the broccoli and use white sauce with broccoli rather than the usual red pizza sauce. So I decided to follow suit and even my pizza hating family loved it. Since I wanted to get my daughter to eat it, I made the base thinner and got two medium sized pizzas even after halving the recipe. So set your doubles aside and try this easy and protein rich pizza. I have two recipes for the white sauce which I use for pastas. One is using the traditional method and stirring it in a pan while the other is a microwave quick fix. You can use either recipe to make the white sauce.

Recipe adapted from here

Protein – Broccoli and Amaranth flour

Makes 2  7″ pizzas

WHAT WE NEED

For the base

All purpose flour          1 cup

Amaranth flour             3/4 cup

Instant yeast                   1 1/2 tsp 

Sugar                                1/2 tsp

Warm water                    1/2 cup + 2 tbsp

Salt                                     3/4 tsp

Oil                                       2 tbsp

For the topping & sauce

White sauce                      3/4 cup

Broccoli                              1 cup

Chilly flakes (optional)   

Salt

Mixed herbs (optional)                

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix all the ingredients for the base together till there is no dry flour left 
  • Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface for 5-6 minutes
  • Transfer the dough to a greased bowl 
  • Cover and set it aside till it increases in volume
  • The dough will take around 1 and half hours to expand about 60-70%. Since we have amaranth flour in it, it won’t double easily. But I found this level of expansion satisfactory for making the pizza
  • Steam the broccoli in hot water for 5-6 minutes 
  • Drain the water and mix it with salt and chilly flakes, if using 
  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Divide the dough into 2 or more parts as per your requirement
  • Roll each piece of dough into a circular shape to a thickness of your preference
  • Transfer it to a greased baking tray
  • Spread the white sauce on it leaving an inch at the edges
  • Place the broccoli florets on the sauce and sprinkle some mixed herbs, if using
  • Bake for 18-20 minutes or till the ends start browning
  • Take it out of the oven, divide it into 6 or 8 slices
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. If you are using active dry yeast instead of instant yeast, then you need to mix the yeast, warm water and sugar and set it aside for 5 minutes or till it starts bubbling and turns frothy. Add the oil and salt next and finally the flours and mix well
  2. You can include other vegetables like mushroom and corn along with broccoli 
  3. You can also top it with cheese if you like. I thought this was flavourful as it is and did not need the cheese. If you are topping it with cheese then broil the pizza for a couple of minutes before removing it from the oven for it melt and turn light brown

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon for the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.

BMLogo
Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Roasted Chana Dal

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Today is the final day of lentil and bean based protein dishes for this mega marathon. I have recipes for 8 different lentils and beans and varied dishes like a soup, breakfast and main course. Today’s recipe is a simple and quick snack – roasted chana dal / bengal gram. You can have it as is or mix it with some puffed rice and chutneys and eat it like a bhel puri. I have a super quick bhel puri recipe that you can check out. If you do not have the chutneys you can still fix yourself a ‘sookha bhel’ (dry bhel).

I don’t use chana dal very often. Its use is mostly restricted to being part of all mixed rice varieties I make or in the ‘dosa chilly podi’. So in my effort to use it more, I picked this crunchy recipe for this marathon.

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The seasoning for this roasted chana dal can be anything of your choice depending on your palate. I had some ‘desi tadka’ spice mix that I needed to use up and so I used that. You can use red chilly powder, chaat masala, etc.

Protein – Bengal gram / chana dal

Recipe adapted from here

Makes 1 cup

WHAT WE NEED

Bengal gram                                  1 cup

Oil                                                    2 tsp

Spice powder mix                        1 tsp

Salt

Water

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the chana dal in water for an hour
  • Drain it and place it in a vessel with enough water to fully cover the chana dal
  • Heat the vessel and bring to boil
  • Simmer for a minute and turn off the gas
  • The chana dal should be cooked but retain its bite and not become mushy
  • Spread it on an absorbent towel for around 15 minutes to dry
  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Line a baking tray with 2 layers of aluminium foil
  • Toss the chana dal with the oil, spice mix and salt in a bowl
  • Place the chana dal on the baking tray in a single layer
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes
  • Remove the tray every 10-12 minutes and give it a shake
  • The chana dal will be crisp and will become crisper on cooling
  • Allow it to cool and store in an airtight container
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Dishes’.

BMLogo
Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Black Gram Dosa with black gram chutney powder

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My mother is very interested in my blogging themes and enthusiastically keeps a look out for dishes that fit my theme of the month. Though she prefers me cooking and blogging about more traditional Indian dishes instead of ‘baking bread all the time’, she still supports my endeavour in a big way. She saw this recipe on a Tamil cookery show and promptly wrote it down to tell me. 

Usually dosa is made with skinless black gram but this dosa is made with the whole black gram which is the same one used to make dal makhni. Another interesting feature was that the black gram did not have to be soaked in order to make the dosa. I was intrigued when I heard that and thought I should give it a shot. For the past few weeks I am experimenting with grinding my idli / dosa batter in a mixer rather than the wet grinder. One, it is easier to clean and can also be used for smaller quantities as compared to the grinder. Though I am not completely pleased with the idli results from such an endeavour, the dosa works beautifully. So I used a mixer for this recipe too and it turned out quite nice. 

This dosa is also accompanied by a black gram podi / dry chutney powder which is to be mixed with oil and spread on the dosa. The combination is fantastic and I would recommend you try the two together instead of having this dosa with a regular red chilly lentil powder.

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Protein – Black gram

Recipe from Revathi Sankaran’s TV show

Makes 10-12 dosas

WHAT WE NEED

For the Dosa 

Idli rice                     3 cups

Raw rice                    1 cup

Black gram                1 cup

Fenugreek seeds       1 tsp

For the chutney podi

Black gram                 1/4 cup

Bengal gram               1 tbsp

Dried red chillies       5-6 

Salt

WHAT TO DO

For the dosa

  • Soak the idli rice and raw rice together and the fenugreek seeds in a separate vessel for 6 hours or overnight
  • Wash the black gram well and add it to a mixer / blender
  • Grind it well to a near smooth paste and set aside
  • Drain the water from the rice and add to the blender
  • Add the fenugreek seeds and salt and grind to a smooth paste
  • Mix the ground black gram and the rice and set aside to ferment for 6-8 hours depending on the weather
  • If the weather is chilly and you are not sure the batter will ferment then wrap the vessel with a thick towel and place it on top of the refrigerator. The heat from the refrigerator will help fermenting.
  • Once the batter has fermented, add some water and salt, if needed.
  • Heat a tava
  • Pour a ladle full of batter on the tava and spread it in a circular motion
  • Add few drops of oil at the edges of the dosa and let it cook for 20-30 seconds on medium high
  • Gently release the dosa from the tava with a steel spatula and turn it over on the other side
  • Let it cook for 10-20 seconds on low
  • Take out the dosa from the tava
  • Repeat the same procedure till all the dosas you need are made
  • Enjoy with the chutney powder

For the chutney powder

  • Dry roast the black gram, bengal gram and dried red chillies in a pan individually and set aside to cool
  • Add all the ingredients with salt to a blender 
  • Blend to a coarse powder 
  • Once the dosa is made, mix the chutney powder with a little gingely oil and apply on the dosa
  • Enjoy!


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  This is my post for the Mega Marathon under the theme, ‘Protein Rich Dishes’. 

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80

Rajma Masala

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When I made the list of dishes, I did not realize that most of the recipes with lentils and beans are a traditional and classic dish from different cuisines. Today I am posting about the ubiquitous Rajma Masala. I have hardly made this dish because the husband hates rajma. For someone who eats most Indian dishes, his hatred for rajma is absolutely perplexing to me. But the only way I have managed to get him to eat this bean is by making a ‘sundal’ with it and adding coconut (lots of coconut).

During our Blogging Marathon meet earlier this year, Preeti of Simply Tadka generously fed us all some amazing rajma masala immediately on our arrival at the airport. I, for one, was blown over by the amazing amalgamation of flavours with the rajma and the dish lingered in my memory long after. Then one day, just like that, I started craving for some rajma magic just like my typical bread and cheese cravings. I simply had to make and devour it at the earliest. 

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So I ran down to the shop in our apartment complex which is a magical world in itself. You can find almost anything you need there. I have never seen it shut despite going there at all odd hours (because cravings!).  The bonus is that the shop owner is from Kerala and so he gets the most amazing banana chips ever. As soon as the chips arrive you can see people grabbing a packet lest the stock runs out. And it does run out pretty fast. The first time I had those chips I knew 2 things – one, those are the fresh-est, tastiest banana chips ever, and two, I am never going to successfully lose weight. 

Anyway, back to our dish of the day –

Protein – Rajma / Kidney beans

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

Rajma / Kidney beans                                  1 cup

Onion, large                                                   1

Tomatoes, medium                                       3

Garlic cloves                                                   4

Ginger                                                              1″

Green chillies                                                  2

Coriander powder                                         1 tsp

Red chilly powder                                         1/2 tsp

Turmeric powder                                          1/4 tsp

Asofoetida                                                       a pinch

Garam masala                                                1/2 tsp

Cumin seeds                                                    1/2 tsp

Kasuri methi                                                    1 tsp

Oil                                                                      3 tbsp

Milk                                                                   3 tbsp

Water

Salt
WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the rajma overnight or for 8 hours
  • Drain the water and add 4 cups of water to the rajma
  • Pressure cook for 4 whistles and set aside for 15 minutes till the entire pressure from the cooker is released
  • Check if the rajma is fully cooked by pressing a bean between your fingers. If it cannot be mashed then cook for another 10 minutes
  • Heat oil in a pan and add cumin seeds
  • Finely chop the onions and add to the pan
  • Let it cook till the onions start browning
  • Grind the ginger, garlic and green chillies to a paste
  • Add the paste to the pan, mix and cook for a minute
  • Chop the tomatoes and add them to the pan
  • Salute for 2-3 minutes till the tomatoes become soft
  • Add the spice powders – turmeric, red chilly, coriander, garam masala and asofoetida
  • Mix well and cook till the oil starts leaving the sides of the pan
  • Drain the water from the rajma and set it aside
  • Add the rajma to the pan and mix well
  • Add 1 1/2 cups of water that was used to cook the rajma 
  • Add salt and simmer without a lid for 10-12 minutes
  • We need the gravy to thicken slightly and not be watery
  • Mash a few rajma beans to thicken the gravy
  • Add kasuri methi and milk
  • Mix well and simmer for 2 minutes
  • Serve with roti or rice
  • Enjoy!

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 This is my post for the Mega Marathon under ‘Protein Rich Dishes’.

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Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 80