Apple yeast water Bread

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I have been reading up on making yeast water with different fruits and seeds and it is such an exciting concept. During one such binge, I came across this beautiful recipe in Facebook of a bread with apple yeast water and bread flour. I simply had to try it. So I immediately cut up an apple and put it into a bottle with twice the volume of water and I was rewarded with some fizzy yeast water that I used to make this bread.

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I have ranted quite a bit about bread flour not being available in India and how much I would love to bake with it. During my visit to Mumbai, I caught up with one of our blogging group members, Kalyani who gave me the best gift ever – bread flour!! I was so thrilled and excited. One part of me wanted to bake with it immediately and the other part wanted to just preserve it till the end of time. Finally I baked this beautiful bread with it and it turned out quite good that even the husband eagerly ate it.

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I have blogged about making raisin yeast water previously. Apple yeast water can be made with the same procedure by just replacing apples for raisins.

Apple yeast water starter is made by feeding one part of the sourdough starter with flour and apple yeast water in equal weight and let it double in 4-6 hours.

Makes 1 loaf

WHAT WE NEED

218 gms Bread flour

50 gms Spelt flour

68 gms Semolina

200 gms Water

35 gms Apple yeast water

75 gms Apple yeast water starter (100% hydration)

15 gms Salt

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the bread flour, spelt flour and semolina with apple yeast water and water and refrigerate for 8-10 hours
  • Add the apple yeast water starter and mix well
  • Set aside for 15 minutes
  • Add the salt and mix
  • Slap and fold the dough for around 10 minutes and set aside in a greased bowl
  • Stretch and fold the dough 3 times within 2 hours, cover and set aside to double in volume
  • Refrigerate for 16-18 hours
  • Take the dough from the refrigerator and shape it into a ball by stretching the dough on all four sides and pulling it under
  • Proof the dough for around 2 hours or overnight in the refrigerator
  • Preheat the oven to 250C
  • Transfer the dough to an oven safe bowl with a lid
  • Before closing the bowl, slash the dough in 2-3 places on top
  • Bake at 250C for 20 minutes
  • Remove the lid of the bowl and reduce the temperature to 230C and bake for 15 minutes or till the top is a nicely brown
  • Take the loaf out of the bowl and cool on a wire rack
  • Let it cool completely before slicing
  • Enjoy!

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This is part of the Bake-a-thon 2017

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Raisin Yeast Water Bread

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It is December which means it is time for Bake-a-thon when I am part of the enthusiastic food bloggers group who blog about baked dishes three times a week for this whole month. As usual I had big time plans of having a specific theme for this month and being prepared in advance. Though I did not manage to get the theme working, I did manage to be quite well prepared for once. My theme was to be sourdough baking but I had quite a few failures in my experiments and so I have decided to put that aside for now and get back to it once I have figured it out.

One of the experiments I did was baking with sourdough and yeast water. I discovered yeast water by chance and have been fascinated by it ever since. There are not too many blogs and websites focused on yeast water and so most of my information and knowledge is based on what I get from other people on FB groups. I had blogged about making yeast water and this is the bread I baked from that yeast water. The results are not perfect but quite nice for a first time effort. Raisin is the easiest to start with for yeast water but it can be made with other fruits like apple, peach, cherry, etc.

If you do not have yeast water, you can bake with regular water to get a beautiful loaf.

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Makes one 8″ bread

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

For the preferment

32 gms    All purpose flour

32 gms    Raisin yeast water

8 gms    Sourdough starter

For the dough

Preferment from above

115 gms Whole wheat flour

40 gms All purpose flour

60 gms Raisin yeast water

60 gms Warm water

4 gms Salt

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the flour, raisin yeast water and salt for the preferment, cover with cling film and set aside for 12 hours
  • The preferment should have increased in volume and feel alive
  • In a large bowl, take the flours, raisin yeast water, warm water and salt
  • Add the preferment and mix well to ensure no dry flour is left
  • Knead the dough for 5 minutes till it becomes soft wet dough
  • Cover it with cling film and set aside for an hour
  • Dab some flour on your hand and lift a part of the dough gently from below without tearing it apart, stretch till you feel the resistance from the dough and fold it on top of the rest of the dough. It is similar to folding the dough into half
  • Turn the bowl 90 degrees and repeat the procedure till you have folded in the dough on all four sides.
  • Set aside covered for 45 minutes
  • Repeat the stretch and fold another time on all four sides and set aside for an hour
  • With each stretch and fold the dough will be more firm and less wet
  • The dough needs to be shaped. It can be any shape of your choice – like a boule, loaf, etc.
  • Transfer the dough to a lightly flour-ed surface and shape it as per your choice
  • Set aside and let it proof for around 2 hours
  • Press the dough with a flour-ed finger. This is the finger dent test. If the dough springs back immediately then it needs to proof for longer. If it does not spring back then it is overproofed. If it springs back slowly but not completely then the dough is proofed right
  • Try the finger dent test at around 1 and half hours and then again around 2 hours
  • Preheat the oven to 230C for 20-30 minutes
  • Transfer the dough carefully to a baking tray
  • Slash the top so as to allow the steam to escape without spoiling the shape of the bread
  • Bake for 40 minutes
  • Take off the loaf from the oven and let it cool completely before cutting it into slices
  • Enjoy!

 

This is part of the Bake-a-thon 2017

Raisin Yeast Water

Once you bake breads with instant / active dry yeast for a reasonable amount of time, it is a natural progression to baking with sourdough. When I read about sourdough, I was fascinated to know that you actually can bake with just flour and water as a starter. I started my usual fanatical search for ​information on sourdough and one thing led to another and I chanced upon baking with yeast water. It absolutely blew me away. I discovered that baking with yeast water is not as popular as baking bread with sourdough or yeast but it is as fascinating and has myriad possibilities as you can imagine.

What is yeast water? Yeast water is water fermented by using fruits / flowers / dry fruits / leaves which can then be used to bake bread. This yeast water lends a fantastic flavour to the bread. It can be used as is i.e. replacing the water quantity in a recipe with yeast water or it can be used along with a sourdough starter. You can make yeast water with a variety of items. Raisins is the easiest since it contains a significant amount of natural sugar. You can also make yeast water with apples, orange, plums, apricot, mint, strawberries, etc.

Strangely there is not enough information online about yeast waters or there is a secret cove that I am yet to discover. Here is whatever I have managed to find out. I will try and keep updating this page with new information based on what I read and also what I observe with my experiments.

I tried to make yeast water with raisins but I was unsuccessful the first time. Next I tried with apples but that was not successful either. Then I tried with raisins again and this time I finally struck gold. I have very few pictures because I took step by step pictures the first couple of time but was disappointed with the results. So I did not click much during this attempt which was finally successful.

HOW TO MAKE YEAST WATER

WHAT YOU NEED

Container

Raisins

Water

Container

  • It can be a plastic or glass jar. Ensure it is transparent so that you can observe the activity within.
  • The size of the jar needs to be such that there are few inches space above the raisins and water for the gas to build up

Raisins

  • The raisins should be preferably organic because other raisins may have sulfur coating which prevents fermentation
  • Ensure organic raisins do not have oil coated on them. That is again detrimental to making yeast water

Water

  • It is ideal to use filtered water
  • Tap water can contain chlorine and will block fermentation and so should not be used
  • To use tap water or chlorinated water, leave it open in a vessel for 24 hours and the chlorine will dissipate and it can be used after that

 

WHAT TO DO

  • There is no specific quantity to make yeast water. It is better to start small. We need the water quantity to be twice that of the raisin quantity. If you are using 1/3 cup of raisins, you will need 2/3 cup of water
  • Choose your container after determining the quantity of raisins and water so that there is some head space in the container for gas build up
  • Wash the container well / sterilize it
  • Place the raisins and water in the container and shut it tightly
  • Set aside for 24 hours
  • After that, shake it 2-3 times everyday and degass it twice a day.
  • Degass means to open the jar for a few seconds and shut it again tightly. Preferably degass at the same time everyday
  • Initially the raisins will be at the bottom of the jar
  • After 3-4 days, all the raisins will rise to the top of the water in the jar and the water will change colour to brown
  • There are three indicators to know that the yeast water is ready – all the raisins have risen to the top of the water, when you shake the jar there is a visible fizz and the strong smell
  • This can take anywhere between 4-6 days depending on the quality of the raisins, water and weather.
  • It can then be used for baking bread
  • It can also be stored in a refrigerator after straining the raisins out for around a month
  • Feed it a spoon of sugar / honey once in 10 days to keep it going
  • While baking, you can also use the raisins in the bread or it can be discarded

Check out a couple of pictures I managed to get of my raisin yeast water

 

I will be posting my bread with yeast water recipe soon. Hope you like it and give it a shot.